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Small reviews of (I think) all incremental games I've ever played on Android

I don't know if this will be useful to anyone. So I write a line or two about every game I play, and decided to find all the incremental in my game journal and post them here. It starts with the latest games I've played and I think goes back to several years back. One thing I've realized is I have such a love-hate-hate relationship with this genre since I think I've hated 90% of the games and 100% of myself after each incremental phase. I usually angrily stop playing them for a while and restart them again, so this is more or less a journal of addiction, I suppose.
THE BEST GAMES I'VE PLAYED ARE THESE (no order):
  1. Kittens Game
  2. Antimatter Dimensions
  3. Oil Tycoon
Honorable Mention: Eggs, Inc
The rest: more or less hated it
Additional comment if you decide to scan through it, I complain a lot, so it is perfectly reasonable and normal to think, "why the fuck are you even playing these games, idiot??".

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Time Idle RPG
This game was confusing. It tells me the game's resources is time, where you get 1 of it every second, but that's not really something as unique as I assumed. It would have been cool if time as resources meant you used it to deal with something related to time. Maybe time travel? Maybe slowing and speeding time?
Instead time as resource buys you stuff like a library. And then you buy a camp or something. Honestly, I wasn't really feeling it.
2
Path of Idling
The biggest cardinal sin for me when it comes to incremental is when a game has a lot of features and it just completely throws them all at you instantly. The joy of a great incremental is how things slowly open up and each new achievement feels progress.
The game is a RPG game and these are the things that opened up for me in the first few hours.
Combat which includes normal fighting, dungeon, raid, boss, PVP (locked, but it just needs an ascend, which I haven't done)
Skills
Hero upgrades which include Passive (strength, defence, stamina, intelligence), Train, and a huge Tree
Town which you can buy workers who get you various things like gold, orbs, knowledge, etc. You can upgrade stuff here.
Quest that also includes Perks and Skill quests.
Gear which 5 equipment slots, plus craft plus trade plus smelt
Also gear for your Pet, which is also another tab!
Now, here is the thing. Because I have all of this pretty much instantly, I don't really know which ones are helping me go past a well. How is adding 10 points in strength helping me? Should I have added five in strength instead and five in defence? I have already bought 20 or so upgrades in the Tree, but I have no idea if I am made the optimal choice. There is no real excitement with getting new gear. And so on.
The dev has added a lot of features, now it's time to rework the game, and have the features take their time.
2
Idle Slayer
The game is like a super simple platformer. Your character is running and any enemy it hits, it automatically slays it. There is no HP, and all enemies die in one shot. Your only active play is jumping occasionally to grab coins or hit the flying enemies. Also, you have a run skill that has a cool down.
With the coins, we get new weapons that give us more coins. Enemies give us souls which is used for the prestige system that provides us with an interesting skill tree which provides a lot of choices on the path you want to do in terms of upgrades.
So far excellent, however, the game has an extremely serious issue of pacing. The game initially progresses so fast that in the first hour or so, you get almost all the weapons aside from the last two, which then grinds down to a snail pace. You can upgrade your past weapons, but they never really get into play again. Reaching high levels of past weapons sometimes gave me upgrades of that weapon of 10,000% but they still did nothing to my overall coin per second. I think the pacing needs to be fully reworked. It would have been nice to get new weapons after certain prestige cycles, so that every new weapon feels like we have passed a significant wall. The best part of an incremental game for me is to face a wall, and when I finally break it, I feel powerful again for a while. This game feels like this though, powerful powerful powerful powerful WALL........break it....WALL. And so on. I'm still playing it as I want to get some of the skills, but I feel like it could have been so much better.
4
Exponential Idle
A very back to the foundation kind of incremental. The premise is that you are a student and working on a formula. There is a neat story where as you progress in the game, your character progresses through university. Each upgrade gives you more and more automation until I reached a stage where I would check back once every 2 or 3 days, click a 2nd layer prestige reset, and close it. Meaning the game was something like 5 seconds of game player every 2 days. I just opened it for this review and realized I had reached the end game. The story wraps up and it tells me "You can take a rest. Travel a bit. Go outside!" NO, DON'T TELL ME WHAT TO DO GAME.
3
Factoid
Factoid & Spark should have the same review as they are almost the same game with only small differences. The games are the most basic kind of incremental, where you buy something with resources, until you get the next thing which gives you more of the resources. Both give you upgrades to speed things up, and finally prestige and it's own prestige upgrades. That's it. It's nice little change of pace from all the recent incremental that sometimes do too much, but obviously due to the very simple nature of it, it does eventually feel pointless, specially after you more or less open up everything and the prestige upgrades just keep repeating.
3
Spark
Factoid & Spark should have the same review as they are almost the same game with only small differences. The games are the most basic kind of incremental, where you buy something with resources, until you get the next thing which gives you more of the resources. Both give you upgrades to speed things up, and finally prestige and it's own prestige upgrades. That's it. It's nice little change of pace from all the recent incremental that sometimes do too much, but obviously due to the very simple nature of it, it does eventually feel pointless, specially after you more or less open up everything and the prestige upgrades just keep repeating. 3
Antimatter Dimensions
Easily top 5 incremental on mobile. Does everything perfectly. You progress nicely, and when new features open it, not only is it rewarding but more importantly, it keeps adding new dimensions (lol) to the game. I'd at the end game as I write this, and I realize that there was no point in the game where it felt stale. Each new prestige layer made the game feel fresh and almost like a new incremental game.
5
Melvor Idle
It seems this game was mainly aimed at Runescape players, which is probably why it didn't click for me. It also run extremely slow on my phone which also played a part in me not really getting into.
2
A Girl Adrift
The animation is really pretty and is a nice change of pace for incrementals, but I didn't really like the too much active play. Really had to keep going back and forth to different areas to do the fishing which got too repetitive for me.
You travel to different areas of the map to catch fish, which you get points and then you upgrade stuff, but I didn't really find any real excitement about the upgrades because I kept having to go back to previous areas to fish similar creatures.
3
Archer: Danger Phone
I'm really annoyed how terrible of a game this was. Two things I like, the TV show "Archer" and incremental games, and it's done in the most lazy manner. The game is the worst aspect of idle games where it's just a straight path of clicking the next upgrade with absolutely zero decision making. Every once in a while there is a mini game where Archer gets to shoot others but it's done in the most basic form of early 2000s flash games, where the animation budget is probably 3 dollars. Same static background and both enemies and Archer have just two animation frames. The absolute laziness of it is almost insulting to the player, because it feels like we aren't even worth the effort.
There is an Archer story in the game which develops really fast, which is the only positive part, but no voice acting is again another evidence that the creators of the game weren't given any budget for this.
1
Home Quest
This game is way too slow. You have to collect materials to build your settlement but everything takes time, so you click for a few seconds, and then you have to leave the game. Which I'm fine with, but the problem isn't the idle part of it, it's how the idle part of it combines with constant checking of the game which annoys me. I like an idle game where you forget to start the game for a day, you come up to a lot of resources, but this is a game which needs you to check back in every 30 minutes or an hour to really get anywhere. I felt that the micromanagement was getting worse as I progressed (without any actual thing to do when I am active in the game) that made me give up.
2
Idle Industry
This is probably an interesting game, but I gave up because the one thing I really disliked was the amount of resources and manufacturing that very quickly opens to you. You can buy raw materials, and you can either sell these raw materials or turn them into finished goods and sell them either. And each of these has several upgrade options (increase selling price, increase production, etc). Without even really getting too deep into the game, I have around 20 raw materials and around 30 finished products. A satisfying part of this genre is to have things slow open up for you, which gives me a decent feeling of satisfaction. But the money I got would quickly open up new products, so I would just jump ahead and purchase more expensive ones, and after a while I had a lot of materials and products at zero, and was instead focusing on latter ones.
2
Masters of Madness
Somewhat neat atmosphere and visuals, but too much active clicking. Click, upgrade to get more per clicks, get minions to get you some points without clicking, typical clicker, but with the added benefit of almost no idling. I like idling incrementals but clickers is a hard no from me.
1
Soda Dungeon 2
Basically similar to the first one, as far as I could tell. I did "finish" it but maybe I shouldn't have, since it really is the same thing from early on, specially once you get all the heroes and you kind of sort out which characters work best, then it's just the same. But because it was somewhat short and no real wall, it was at least easy to stick to it to the end.
2
Bacterial Takeover
Played for a decent amount and was actually more interesting that I thought, given the buttload of ad incentives. You create and upgrade bacteria, attack planets, and eventually go into a blackhole to prestige. Most of the game was good, but the part that killed it for me was the prestige system. Once you prestige, planets get super easy to attack, which becomes a lot of active play. I realized that each prestige was taking me at least 30 minutes to get to where I was, and it was just meaningless clicking. It got to a point where I was putting off prestige because it seemed like it would be a hassle so I stopped.
2
LogRogue
Cute graphics. The hero sort of hopping to hit the tiny monsters is cute to look at, but how long can you look at it and do nothing before you realize that it's boring? I suppose this is a game where it's just not for me. I don't like to have my phone open on a game and just watch it like a crazy person and do nothing. My rule is simple for incrementals. While the app is open, be active, if there isn't any choices to make, close the app while resources build up or whatever. I don't like it being open while I do nothing.
3
A Kittens Game
Incremental games are so strange. I get in and out of the phases. I loved this for so long and so obsessively that I wanted to only play incremental games. And then, just like that, I was wondering why the fuck I was wasting my time with this. Has happened countless times before.
But still probably the best incremental ever.
5
A Dark Room
An incremental cult classic of sorts but I don't find it really matches the genre. There is a bit of incremental at the beginning with people huts and stuff but then its just a ascii exploring game, which wasn't interesting to me.
2
Little Healer
Saw it mentioned in the Reddit incremental forum in one of the posts and thought it was a healer themed incremental which sounded neat. But it's like being a healer in a raid in World of Warcraft without any if the extras. Just a couple of bars representing your team mates and you healing them while they fight the boss. I didn't even like playing the healer in WoW so no way would I play this game.
1
Clickie Zoo
Started playing for a few days until I realized there a beta released with the dev reworking the game completely from scratch and releasing it as "Idle Zoo Tycoon". So, played that instead but this seemed like a game I would enjoy anyway.
4
Idling to Rule the Gods
The UI and one drawing if your character is really ugly enough to be distracting to me. The game, seemed interesting and I eventually was into it, but seems like a game that has been constantly being updated, which is not always a good thing, because features are obviously updated regularly to it, making the whole thing a bit bloaty.
I guess, this is the problem with this game for me, it's too fat. Also, one main part of the game is that your character creates Shadow Clones up to a maximum limit. Which is fine except the clones can't be made in offline mode. This might not be a big deal in its original web browser game but that doesn't work as well in a mobile format.
2
Realm Grinder
This is one of the really popular incremental and it's fanbase seems to love it for it's depth, but to be honest, I don't play these games for the depth, I play it for the simple dopamine rush of doing the same thing over and over again. It relaxes.
Although, I didn't even get to the depth part because I dislike games where it rushes in the beginning. I constantly bought buildings, got spells, and got upgrades without even looking at the description. Apparently, later on, we can get complicated race upgades, which seems not what I'm looking for in such a genre.
2
Spaceplan
A short (!!) incremental with an actual story (!!!). That's two cool points for it but unfortunately, the game mechanics of increment genre isn't so good. It's a space game with nice visuals and a great ending (cool music set to cool graphics) but the game itself wasn't really that fun. This same exact game would have been better in a different genre (maybe something like "Out There"?)
3
Zombidle
Felt like idle games again and this is the kind of examples that kept me away. Too much clicking and seems like advancement will start to get irritating since it relies on IAPs
2
Eggs, Inc
While I was playing it, Eggs, Inc was probably my favorite Android game I had ever played. But like most incremental games, there comes a moment when I suddenly stop and think, what am I doing?
Because there is something fascinating about Incrementals. Their addictiveness is in a way the whole point. An incremental is less of a game and more an act of electronic addictiveness. What's the point?
Eggs, Inc is a very well made and fun incremental but even the best in its genre is still pointless.
4
Castle Clicker
Supposedly a mix of incremental and city building but didn't really find out since the clickings were way to much. I know this is supposed to be the genre but I like the incremental part more than the tapping part. This seemed to be a good way to hurt your fingers.
2
Endless Era
This RPG clicker game is like other such games but with horrible GUI and animations. Tap tap tap. It's my fault for downloading such games. Why would I ever think this would be fun???
1
Idle Quote
An incremental game with a unique twist. This time we get to make up quotes! The first negative about the game and this irritates me a lot is most of the quotes are fake. A quick search on Google and this proves it. Quotes are generally attributed to Buddha or Ghandi or shit like that and it's usually fake like most quotes on the internet. This kills the major possible advantage of the game because I thought coming up with arbitrary words would at least give me some quotes to learn. Aside from the this, the game isn't fun either because it slows down very quickly meaning you combine words very slowly at a certain stage of the game and then it becomes a boring grind.
2
Monster Miser
An incremental game with almost no graphics. We just see character portraits of monsters which we buy and then upgrade until we buy the next monster. Eventually we prestige which gives us multipliers. The only game choice is choosing between two monsters with each new monster with unique benefits. Annoyingly there is a max limit which I wish didn't exist because I wanted to prestige so much that I would be over powerful in upgrading like that "Idle Oil Tycoon". Still, pointless but reasonably fun.
3
Pocket Politics
An incremental take on politics sounds fun but it's so generic that it could have been about anything. A Capitalist idle game or a cooking idle game, it wouldn't matter. IAP was also the usual shitty kind.
1
Time Clickers
A shooter incremental sounds like a cool twist but it's not a FPS like I imagined it would be. I'm just stuck in a room and I was shooting blocks. Upgrades didn't give me any enjoyment since I was shooting fucking blocks.
1
Tap Tap Fish - Abyssrium
I thought this was going to be relaxing incremental but the ridiculous and generic IAPs and all the social integeration spoil it. Too much time is spent in them asking you to buy or share or tweet or post or give them a blowjob. And there is nothing relaxing about that.
2
Cartoon 999
Incremental game about comic book writers, but not the marvel DC kind, it seemed to be the webcomic one and I think it's a Korean developer so all the characters and injokes made no sense to me. The whole thing was just targeted to a very specific audience.
2
Dungeon Manager
Incremental games need to be simple but this is beyond simple, it's just upgrade a fighter to level 5, go to next dungeon character, do the same, and just continue without any of the delicious balancing of upgrades like other idle games.
2
Final Fortress
Incremental games are already pointless but when it's super heavy on IAP than its also annoying, but when it always has bugs that doesn't register my offline earnings, then it just needs a uninstall in its face.
The zombie skin was also crappy.
1
Mana Maker
Here is how I know this clicker isn't very good. It doesn't make me hate all clickers and my life and mobile gaming in general for being so addictive and pointless.
So fail, sorry.
2
Infinity Dungeon
The usual incremental RPG that I should probably never play again. Starts simple enough and then gets more or a chore as you play.
1
Another incremental game which I had promised myself not to play anymore because they are so pointless and repetitive and endless. Well, this wasn't infinite and had a goal at 999 level so I thought it was good but while the humor was cute, the game did become very repetitive. Every 10 levels the slimes changed but after every 100 levels the whole thing restarted and while the monsters got stronger, I seemed to get even stronger. So the game became easier as I progressed and there was no more challenge. By level 800, I gave up.
2
Tap Dungeon RPG
Okay, I'm running out of ways to complain about those incremental RPG games that all have similar problems. It starts off reasonably fast and fun but soon it seems like I am in a data entry job. Doing the same thing over and over again with little changes.
1
Dungeon 999 F: Secret of Slime Dungeon
Another incremental game which I had promised myself not to play anymore because they are so pointless and repetitive and endless. Well, this wasn't infinite and had a goal at 999 level so I thought it was good but while the humor was cute, the game did become very repetitive. Every 10 levels the slimes changed but after every 100 levels the whole thing restarted and while the monsters got stronger, I seemed to get even stronger. So the game became easier as I progressed and there was no more challenge. By level 800, I gave up.
2
Tap Dungeon RPG
Okay, I'm running out of ways to complain about those incremental RPG games that all have similar problems. It starts off reasonably fast and fun but soon it seems like I am in a data entry job. Doing the same thing over and over again with little changes.
1
Tower of Hero
You start on the first floor of the tower and keep fighting your way up by summoning your heroes (by clicking) and recruiting other fighters, get upgrades, level up, and then, ugh, here is the typical incremental RPG part, restart, get items, and do it ALL over again.
There is something fun about restarting and getting slowly stronger each time but it also feels so pointless after a while. Such a pointless genre now that I have played a billion of such titles, heh.
3
Pageboy
Yet another incremental RPG which I have no idea why I downloaded because I'm sick of the genre. I played a pageboy to a knight who does the fighting while I collect the lot. I collect the loot, buy stuff for the knight, and eventually I restart to do the same thing again and get better items but this game I didn't even RESTART! Because fuck it! Fuck it!
2
Idle Warriors
The story is cute. Human population is regressing while monster population is on the rise. So the humans start enslaving monsters to mine for them! The brave warriors beat the crap out of monsters, kidnap the bosses, and enslave them. The animation of monsters slaving away while speech balloons above them talk about their wife and children is funny.
But the game itself is another RPG incremental which I should start staying away from. These games are like a chore for me nowadays because I'm doing the same crap again and again. The blame is probably on me because it seems like a reasonably solid game. But hey, fuck it, I PERSONALLY didn't enjoy it.
2
Tap! Tap! Faraway!
Any game that is remotely like Tap Titan scares me. They are addictive at first and very fast moving but after every restart gets more and more annoying. It soon turns into a time eating activity with the player having to redo the initial levels to get relics to get better items to progress further to restart to get relics to and so on until the player realizes how much time he is putting in the game for a repetitive activity.
2
Auto RPG
Now that is a title the game developers didn't spend too much time on. RPG battles are automatic but I can help out by clicking like a mad man. I started with one hero but would get additional members in my party as the story progressed. Party members receive skills as as they level up and while all the skill usage is automatic, it did give me a sense of progression which is extremely important in a RPG and which I think is usually lacking in incremental games. It usually starts feeling useless but in this game at least there are new maps, new members, and an actual end sight!
There is an infinity stage once the last boss is defeated but I am glad the infinity stage happens AFTER the end and it's not the game itself.
4
Merchant
Hire a hero and send on to battle. The battles is done automatically and takes time, starts with something short like 10 seconds with each battle taking longer. The loot is raw materials which can be used to craft equipment which also takes real life time with better items taking longer. The crafted items can either be sold or equipped to the hero to make him be able to fight stronger monsters.
I was worried I would hate the longer crafting and fighting times because I hate games which I have to watch for a task to finish but even though the durations for longer, I had more to do. However, I don't know what would have happened in the end game because I gave up on it. New maps were exactly like the first map just with different heroes but the progression was similar in each level which felt that I was doing the exact same thing all over again but with longer task times.
2
Idle Oil Tycoon
This is the best idle game I played. It's graphics aren't just minor, they are none existent. It's just numbers, so basic that my sister thought I was on a stock market app.
It's such a simple concept. Invest, get oil, upgrade then like other idlers restart to get a bonus and do the full thing all over again. When I finished the game, I played the unlimited mode which I played until the unlimited mode couldn't handle the numbers anymore.
5
Soda Dungeon
This kind-of Idle Dungeon was great. I started with weak ass fighters who would fight on my behalf while I collected the loot. I then got to use the lot to upgrade the sofa bar to recruit more adventurers. Not sure why it was a sofa bar. Maybe they wanted to make it a family game and not have alcohol? Sounds weird but the sofa element in a RPG game sounds weirder.
The game only hit a brick for me when, like most other incremental games, there is no real closure. Once I thought I bet the big bad guy, it just goes on, harder but similar enough with no end in sight. Eventually, we have to stop playing right, but it always feels a bit like a let down when I don't feel like I have finished the game.
4
10 Billion Wives Kept Man Life
The two games from this company, 10 Billion Wives and Kept Man Life, have similar strengths and weaknesses.
I liked the silly premises from both. In 10BM, I had to get married as much as I could, using the loves I collect to marry more expensive wives! In KML, I'm a boyfriend who doesn't work and I have to please my career gf so she would take care of me.
Both start reasonably fast and I was willing to grind through difficult parts but the end game is like a brick wall. Passing through it to get all the achievements is pretty much impossible unless one puts in way too many hours. And it's a shame because I really wanted to get all the achievements to see all the tiny little extra stuff.
3
Adventure Capitalist
One of the better incremental games, but now that I am out of the short lived incremental fan phase, I realized how dumb the genre is. Tap, tap, tap, upgrade, do this a million times, reset, and do it all over again like a moron. The game does deserve credits for me acting like a moron and playing it for so long but I also cheated and got free cash and then if occupying became even more pointless.
3
The Monolith
A combination of an incremental and a civilization building game seemed like an excellent idea and in some ways, it was, specially how we get to upgrade through the ages from cavemen to futuristic. But no offline feature means that the resets aren't enticing.
2
USSR Simulator
An incremental game that has a great theme (USSR!) but absolutely horrible to enjoy, even though I did stick to it. After a certain upgrades, the game just turned into me popping in the game, clicking an upgrade and then forgetting about the game for a few days.
2
RPG Clicker
They should call these games tappers not clickers. We are not clicking anything on a touchscreen device. Anyway, tap tap tap level up buy weapons tap tap and uninstall.
1
Logging Quest Logging Quest 2
[Review is for the original and its sequel]
There is not much of a difference between the game. I actually played them both at the same time because the actual game is offline. You choose your hero, send them to a dungeon, and then come back to the game after a while to see how well they did. I thought an offline RPG like this might be interesting but then, if you don't really play a game, how much fun can it be?
1
Another pointless incremental. I was in an incremental phase and got so many incremental games that I know realize were absolutely pointless.
Hit a tree, buy upgrades, get a new hero, and continue hitting a tree. Not much offline it seems which is what I like about incrementals.
1
Galaxy Clicker
A space incremental that should have been a lot of fun. You get to upgrade your spaceship and buy new ones and explorer new planets. But first of all, the interface is so ugly that it makes playing the game less enjoyable. And a lot of things I didn't really get no matter how much I would play like the full exploring planets. The spaceships were nice, so it could have been fun.
2
Megatramp
A pretty pointless incremental kind of game. You are a tramp and then you can collect money to buy upgrades to make more money, with no strategy needed, nor any effort needs to be made to hurt your brain cells.
1
Inflation RPG
It supposed to be some kind of incremental RPG, I think, which has you resetting and getting more powerful and then fighting monsters to get insane levels. It is very unique but I couldn't get into it.
2
Widget RPG
Are you fucking with me? This is button bashing rpg in the most extreme manner. You get a widget, so you don't even have to open the game and distract yourself from the button bushing. Just click the button and the game plays behind the scenes and gets you experience, loot, and kills.
It's a ridiculous idea that is fun for a few minutes to see what they come up with but there is only so much button bashing you can do.
2
Capitalist Tycoon
I downloaded this game because I was in an incremental/idle game phase and really enjoyed AdVenture Capitalist. But this game is nothing like that. On the surface, it seems similar, buy small investments, make money, buy bigger investments, and so on.
But with this game, there is no offline mode, and you keep having to wake up managers, AND the goal is to see how much you make in one year. Bah. I prefer the incremental approach which makes you build and build and build, not try to rush it in just a year.
2
Clicking Bad
An incremental clicking game that is themed after Breaking Bad. It is a fun idea it's a very simple game with little to do aside from the obvious of upgrading and upgrading. The only twist might be to balance out making lots of money selling drugs and not attracting the law but even that is only a small challenge at the start. Eventually, you will get enough upgrades to bring the law risk so down that it makes no impact on the game play.
2
Zombie Tapper
A super basic incremental clicker game with a zombie team. Click click click to eat brains, use brains (?) to buy zombies to do the brain eating for you and then buy upgrades for your zombies, and buy new zombies and it all feels very pointless.
1
Bitcoin Billionaire
I started to enjoy incremental games, but it needs to have a good offline mode, because I don’t want to just play a game where I keep tapping. But that doesn’t mean I didn’t play. I played it, and I played a lot of it, because I could reset the game (like most incremental games) and it gives you a small benefit where you could finish the full game a bit faster (it gives you bonus income). So, I kept finishing and resetting, and each time the start to finish would shorten, so I thought I would reach a stage where I could finish each start-to-finish in an instant! It didn’t happen. I got bored first.
3
Tap Titan
An addictive tapping game. Just tap on the creatures, level up, get new skills, hire heroes, and then reset and to it all over again to progress further. It’s an incremental game where it depends on resets to progress, but no real offline bonus, so you have to be playing online. Which got boring, so I installed an app that does the tapping for me, which is actually a stupid way to play the game, but this isn’t an attempt to prove to anyone my intelligence. Anyway, thankfully something went wrong and my progress got deleted, WHICH WAS A GOOD THING, because the game was extremely addictive.
4
God Squad
I’ve realized most incremental games are stupid. Tap on monsters to kill, collect gold, buy Roman Gods, level them up, fight other monsters, and then get bored.
1
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vectorbt - blazingly fast backtesting and interactive data analysis for quants

I want to share with you a tool that I was continuously developing during the last couple of months.
https://github.com/polakowo/vectorbt

As a data scientist, when I first started flirting with quant trading, I quickly realized that there is a shortage of Python packages that can actually enable me to iterate over a long list of possible strategies and hyper-parameters quickly. Most open-source backtesting libraries are very evolved in terms of functionality, but simply lack speed. Questions like "Which strategy is better: X or Y?" require fast computation and transformation of data. This not only prolongs your lifecycle of designing strategies, but is dangerous after all: limited number of tests is similar to a tunnel vision - it prevents you from seeing the bigger picture and makes you dive into the market blindly.
After trying tweaking pandas, multiprocessing, and even evaluating my strategies on a cluster with Spark, I finally found myself using Numba - a Python library that can compile slow Python code to be run at native machine code speed. And since there were no packages in the Python ecosystem that could even closely match the speed of my own backtests, I made vectorbt.
vectorbt combines pandas, NumPy and Numba sauce to obtain orders-of-magnitude speedup over other libraries. It builds upon the idea that each instance of a trading strategy can be represented in a vectorized form, so multiple strategy instances can be packed into a single multi-dimensional array. In this form, they can processed in a highly efficient manner and compared easily. It also integrates Plotly and ipywidgets to display complex charts and dashboards akin to Tableau right in the Jupyter notebook. You can find basic examples and explanations in the documentation.

Below is an example of doing in total 67,032 tests on three different timeframes of Bitcoin price history to explore how performance of a MACD strategy depends upon various combinations of fast, slow and signal windows:
import vectorbt as vbt import numpy as np import yfinance as yf from itertools import combinations, product # Fetch daily price of Bitcoin price = yf.Ticker("BTC-USD").history(period="max")['Close'] price = price.vbt.split_into_ranges(n=3) # Define hyper-parameter space # 49 fast x 49 slow x 19 signal fast_windows, slow_windows, signal_windows = vbt.indicators.create_param_combs( (product, (combinations, np.arange(2, 51, 1), 2), np.arange(2, 21, 1))) # Run MACD indicator macd_ind = vbt.MACD.from_params( price, fast_window=fast_windows, slow_window=slow_windows, signal_window=signal_windows, hide_params=['macd_ewm', 'signal_ewm'] ) # Long when MACD is above zero AND signal entries = macd_ind.macd_above(0) & macd_ind.macd_above(macd_ind.signal) # Short when MACD is below zero OR signal exits = macd_ind.macd_below(0) | macd_ind.macd_below(macd_ind.signal) # Build portfolio portfolio = vbt.Portfolio.from_signals( price.vbt.tile(len(fast_windows)), entries, exits, fees=0.001, freq='1D') # Draw all window combinations as a 3D volume fig = portfolio.total_return.vbt.volume( x_level='macd_fast_window', y_level='macd_slow_window', z_level='macd_signal_window', slider_level='range_start', template='plotly_dark', trace_kwargs=dict( colorscale='Viridis', colorbar=dict( title='Total return', tickformat='%' ) ) ) fig.show() 

https://reddit.com/link/hxl6bn/video/180sxqa8mzc51/player
From signal generation to data visualization, the example above needs roughly a minute to run.

vectorbt let's you
The current implementation has limitations though:

If it sounds cool enough, try it out! I would love if you'd give me some feedback and contribute to it at some point, as the codebase has grown very fast. Cheers.
submitted by plkwo to algotrading [link] [comments]

Monthly Nano News: December 2019 + Year Recap Special

This is what NANO has been up to lately. I don't think I lie if I say it has been quite an amazing year!
See you soon and happy new year! Something nice is coming soon that I have been working on for a while, stay tuned..

December 2019

November 2019

October 2019

September 2019

August 2019

July 2019

June 2019

May 2019

Apr 2019

Mar 2019

Feb 2019

Jan 2019


More news here: https://nanolinks.info/news

https://preview.redd.it/9sw5nkoxlt741.png?width=749&format=png&auto=webp&s=3426d4eafb9430c0304a6d161596102536df4318
submitted by Joohansson to nanocurrency [link] [comments]

Defi Coins List In Detail

A Detail List Of Defi Coin

Lending

Trading

Payments

Wallets

Interfaces

Infrastructure

Analytics

Education

Podcasts

Newsletters

Communities

submitted by jakkkmotivator to Latest_Defi_News [link] [comments]

Decred Journal – July 2018

Note: you can read this on Medium, GitHub or old Reddit to view all the links

Development

dcrd: Several steps towards multipeer downloads completed: an optimization to use in-memory block index and a new 1337 chain view. Maintenance: improved test coverage, upgrading dependency management system and preparing for the upcoming Go 1.11 release.
dcrwallet: A big change introducing optional privacy-preserving SPV sync mode was merged. In this mode dcrwallet does not download the full blockchain but only gets the "filters", uses them to determine which blocks it needs and fetches them from random nodes on the network. This has on-disk footprint of 300-400 MB and sync time of minutes, compared to ~3.4 GB and sync time of hours for full sync (these are rough estimates).
jy-p: the server side of SPV (in dcrd) was deployed in v1.2.0, the client side of SPV (in dcrwallet) is in our next release, v1.3.0. Still some minor bugs in SPV that are being worked out. There will be an update to add the latest features from BIP 157/158 in the next few months. SPV will be optional in v1.3.0, but it will become the default after we get a proper header commitment for it (#general)
Decrediton: besides regular bugfixes and design improvements, several components are being developed in parallel like SPV mode, Politeia integration and Trezor support.
Politeia: testing started on mainnet, thanks to everyone who is participating. A lot of testing, bugfixing and polishing is happening in preparation for full mainnet launch. There are also a few missing features to be added before launch, e.g. capacity to edit a proposal and versioning for that, discussion to remain open once voting starts. Decrediton integration is moving forward, check out this video for a demo and this meta issue for the full checklist.
Trezor: Decrediton integration of initial Trezor support is in progress and there is a demo.
Android: app design version 2.0 completed.
dcrdata: development of several chart visualizations was completed and is awaiting deployment. Specifically, voting agendas and historic charts are merged while ticket pool visualization is in testing.
atomicswap: @glendc is seeking reviews of his Ethereum support pull request.
Dev activity stats for July: 252 active PRs, 220 master commits, 34,754 added and 12,847 deleted lines spread across 6 repositories. Contributions came from 6-10 developers per repository. (chart)

Network

Hashrate: the month started at 40.5 and ended at 51.6 PH/s, with a low of 33.3 and a new all time high of 68.4 PH/s. F2Pool is leading with 40-45%, followed by the new BeePool at 15-25% and coinmine.pl at 18-23%.
Staking: 30-day average ticket price is 92.6 DCR (-2.1). The price started the month at 94.6 and quickly retreated to month's low of 85 until 1,860 tickets were bought within a single period (versus target 720). This pushed the pool of tickets to 41,970 (2.5% above target), which in turn caused 10 price increases in a row to the month's high of 100.4. This was the highest ticket price seen on the new ticket price algorithm which has been in effect since Jul 2017. Second half of the month there was unusually low volatility between 92 and 94 DCR per ticket. Locked DCR held between 3.75 and 3.87 million or 46.6-48.0% of supply (+0.1% from previous peak).
Nodes: there are 212 public listening and 216 normal nodes per dcred.eu. Version distribution: 67% on v1.2.0 (+10%), 24% on v1.1.2 (-1%), 7% on v1.1.0 (-7%). Node count data is not perfect but we can see the steady trend of upgrading to v1.2.0. This version of dcrd is notable for serving compact filters. The increased count of such full nodes allows the developers to test SPV client mode in preparations for the upcoming v1.3.0 release.

ASICs

Obelisk posted three updates in July. For the most recent daily updates join their Discord.
New miner from iBeLink: DSM7T hashes Blake256 at 7 TH/s or Blake2b at 3.5 TH/s, consumes 2,100 W and costs $3,800, shipping Aug 5-10.
There were also speculations about the mysterious Pangolin Whatsminer DCR with the speed of 44 TH/s at 2,200 W and the cost of $3,888, shipping November. If you know more about it please share with us in #pow-mining channel.

Integrations

Meet new stake pool: dcrpool.ibitlin.com has 1% fees and is hosted by @life.
An interesting detail about decredbrasil.com stake pool was posted in chat:
emiliomann: stakebrasil is one of the pools with the lowest number of missed and expired tickets. It was one of the first and has a smaller percentage than the most recent ones who haven’t had the time to do so. (...) The Brazilian pool should be the one with the more servers spread around the world: 6 to decrease the latency. This is to explain to you why the [pool fee] rate of 5% (currently around 0.06 DCR) on the reward is also one of the highest. girino: 8 voting wallets now. I just finished setting up a new one yesterday. All of them in different datacenters, 3 in europe, 3 in north america, 1 in brazil and one in asia. We also have 3 more servers, 1 for the front end, one for "stats" and one for dcrdata. (#general)
On the mining side, Luxor started a new set of pool servers inside mainland China, while zpool has enabled Decred mining.
StatX announced Decred integration into their live dashboard and public chat.
Decred was added to Satowallet with BTC and ETH trading pairs. Caution: do your best to understand the security model before using any wallet software.

Adoption

VotoLegal update:
Marina Silva is the first presidential candidate in Brazil using blockchain to keep all their electoral donations transparent and traceable. VotoLegal uses Decred technology, awesome use case! (reddit)
The story was covered by criptonoticias.com (translated) and livecoins.com.br (translated), the latter received hundreds of upvotes and comments on brasil.
On the OTC trading front, @i2Rav from i2trading reports:
We continue to see institutional interest in DCR. Large block buyers love the concept of staking as a way to earn additional income and appreciate the stakeholder rights it affords them. Likening a DCR investment to an activist shareholdebondholder gives these institutions some comfort while dipping their toes into a burgeoning new asset class.

Marketing

Targeted advertising reports released for June and July. As usual, reach @timhebel for full versions.
Big news in June: Facebook reversed their policy on banning crypto ads. ICO ads are still banned, but we should be OK. My team filled out the appeal today, so we should hopefully hear something within a few days. (u/timhebel on reddit)
After couple weeks Facebook finally responded to the appeal and the next step is to verify the domain name via DNS.
A pack of Stakey Telegram stickers is now available. Have fun!

Events

Attended:
Upcoming:

Media

Featured articles:
Articles:
Some articles are omitted due to low quality or factual errors.
Translations:
Videos:

Community Discussions

Community stats:
Comm systems update:
Articles:
Twitter: Ari Paul debates "There can be only one" aka "highlander argument".
Reddit and Forum: how ticket pool size influences average vote time; roadmap concerns; why ticket price was volatile; ideas for using Reddit chat for dcrtrader and alternative chat systems; insette's write-up on Andrew Stone's GROUP proposal for miner-validated tokenization that is superior to current OP_RETURN-based schemes; James Liu's paper to extend atomic swaps to financial derivatives; what happens when all DCR are mined, tail emission and incentives for miners.
Chats: why tickets don't have 100% chance to vote; ideas for more straightforward marketing; long-running chat about world economy and failure modes; @brandon's thoughts on tokenizing everything, ICOs, securities, sidechains and more; challenges of staking with Trezor; ideas how to use CryptoSteel wallet with Decred; why exchange can't stake your coins, how staking can increase security, why the function to export seed from wallet is bad idea and why dcrwallet doesn't ever store the seed; ticket voting math; discussion about how GitHub workflow forces to depend on modern web browser and possible alternatives; funding marketing and education in developing markets, vetting contractors based on deliverables, "Decred contractor clearance", continued in #governance.
#dex channel continues to attract thinkers and host chats about influence of exchanges, regulation, HFT, lot sizes, liquidity, on-chain vs off-chain swaps, to name a few topics. #governance also keeps growing and hosting high quality conversations.

Markets

In July DCR was trading in USD 56-76 and BTC 0.0072-0.0109 range. A recovery started after a volume boost of up to $10.5 m on Fex around Jul 13, but once Bitcoin headed towards USD ~8,000 DCR declined along with most altcoins.
WalletInvestor posted a prediction on dcrtrader.
Decred was noticed in top 10 mineable coins on coinmarketcap.com.

Relevant External

One million PCs in China were infected via browser plugins to mine Decred, Siacoin and Digibyte.
In a Unchained podcast episode David Vorick shared why ASICs are better than GPUs even if they tend toward mining centralization and also described Obelisk's new Launchpad service. (missed in June issue)
Sia project moved to GitLab. The stated reasons are to avoid the risk of depending on centralized service, to avoid vendor lock-in, better continuous integration and testing, better access control and the general direction to support decentralized and open source projects.
Luxor explained why PPS pools are better.
@nic__carter published slides from his talk "An Overview of Governance in Blockchains" from Zcon0.
This article arguing the importance of governance systems dates back to 2007.
Bancor wallet was hacked. This reminds us about the fake feeling of decentralizaion, that custody of funds is dangerous and that smart contracts must have minimum complexity and be verifiable.
Circle announced official Poloniex mobile apps for iOS and Android.
On Jul 27 Circle announced delisting of 9 coins from Poloniex that led to a loss of 23-81% of their value same day. Sad reminder about how much a project can depend on a single centralized exchange.
DCR supply and market cap is now correct on onchainfx.com and finally, on coinmarketcap.com. Thanks to @sumiflow, @jz and others doing the tedious work to reach out the various websites.

About This Issue

This is the 4th issue of Decred Journal. It is mirrored on GitHub, Medium and Reddit. Past issues are available here.
Most information from third parties is relayed directly from source after a minimal sanity check. The authors of Decred Journal have no ability to verify all claims. Please beware of scams and do your own research.
Chat links were changed to riot.im from the static web viewer that suffered from UX issues (filed here and here). We will consider changing back to the static viewer once they are resolved because it does not require javascript to read chat logs.
In the previous issue we introduced "Featured articles". The judgement is subjective by definition, if you feel unfairness or want to debate the criteria please check this issue.
Feedback is appreciated: please comment on Reddit, GitHub or #writers_room.
Contributions are also welcome, some areas are adding content, pre-release review or translations to other languages.
Credits (Slack names, alphabetical order): bee, Haon and Richard-Red.
submitted by jet_user to decred [link] [comments]

Kin Community FAQ, Guidelines, & Ecosystem Directory

Kin Community FAQ, Guidelines, & Ecosystem Directory
Kin FAQ
  1. What is Kin?
  2. Where can I earn & spend Kin?
  3. Where can I buy Kin?
  4. Where can I store Kin?
  5. Why is the total supply so large?
  6. Why isn't Kin on [xyz] exchange? When will it be?
  7. Is there any update on [Y] announcement? Can you speak on [insert rumor here]? When will we be able to do [Z]?
  8. How can I contact the developers / support staff of [insert app name here]?
  9. How can I contact the Kin Foundation?
  10. How can I track transactions on the Kin blockchain?
  11. I still have ERC-20 based Kin (on the Ethereum blockchain), how can I migrate?
  12. I heard the SEC is suing Kik, is that true? What does it mean for Kin?
  13. How was Kin distributed at launch and how does it enter circulation?
  14. I want to integrate Kin into my software project. How do I get started? Where is the developer community?
  15. How can I keep up with the latest developments in Kin?
1 - What is Kin?
Kin is money for the digital world. It can be earned and spent across an entire ecosystem of applications, thanks to the blockchain. If you don’t know what that means, don’t worry; you don’t have to. Kin is designed to be accessible by a broad mainstream audience- computer science degree not required. By bringing together developers and users of all kinds to build in a shared new digital economy, we can create a more fair playing field; one in which the developers and content creators that build these virtual realities are rewarded based on their contributions, not harvested for their personal data and attention against their will. If you’d like to learn more about Kin, here are some resources to get you started:
· Kin Website: https://www.kin.org/
· Kin Whitepaper: https://www.kin.org/static/files/Kin_Whitepaper_V1_English.pdf
· The Vision for Kin: https://medium.com/kinblog/the-vision-for-kin-6ee048a3a979
· Announcement of Kin: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5le2n230oTk
· Introduction to Kin (by u/kyzermf): https://medium.com/hackernoon/introduction-to-kin-universal-virtual-currency-for-apps-ea6464225ffc
2 - Where can I earn & spend Kin?
Kin is going live in a growing number of apps. To see which ones, you can check out the Ecosystem Directory below, or keep up with some of these resources:
· via Kin Website: https://www.kin.org/kin-apps/
· Apps with Kin (by u/Neliss31) https://appswithkin.com/index.php
· Kin Appz (by u/hepays) https://www.kinappz.com/
3 - Where can I buy Kin?
In addition to the ecosystem of apps available to earn Kin, you can also purchase it in larger amounts. It is currently available for purchase on cryptocurrency exchanges listed here:
· CoinMarketCap Exchanges List for Kin https://coinmarketcap.com/currencies/kin/#markets
Note that these are independent organizations and therefore only they can provide guarantees on customer service and experience, please do your due diligence in navigating and utilizing these exchanges. Also note that cryptocurrencies are inherently volatile, trade at your own risk. Kin is money for the digital world, not a stablecoin.
4 - Where can I store Kin?
While using Kin inside of apps, make sure to create a backup of your wallet when possible. It is not recommended that you store large amounts of Kin in your user wallets, and instead seek out a more robust solution. There are lots of subtle differences to the kinds of wallets and how to use them, including trade-offs in security vs convenience. Make sure to do your research and be careful when handling your hard-earned Kin:
Offline (“Cold”) Storage:
· My Kin Wallet https://www.mykinwallet.org/
· Guide: Creating A Paper Wallet for Storing Your Kin Safely Offline (by u/TheRealChaseEB) https://www.reddit.com/KinFoundation/comments/bylk0creating_a_paper_wallet_for_storing_your_kin/
Hardware Wallets:
· Ledger Hardware Wallets (works with My Kin Wallet) https://www.ledger.com/
Software Wallets:
· Trust Wallet (Mobile) https://trustwallet.com/
· Atomic Wallet (Mobile & Desktop) https://atomicwallet.io/
· Guarda Wallet (Mobile & Desktop) https://guarda.co/
· Magnum Wallet (Web) https://magnumwallet.co/
5 - Why is the total supply so large?
Kin is meant to be transacted by a large number of users in manageable denominations, just like physical money.
6 - Why isn’t Kin on [xyz] exchange? When will it be?
A healthy market for developers and users is essential to all stakeholders who want to build a vibrant economy around Kin as a currency. That said, a number of blockers have prevented further listings from happening; for example we needed to first have a unified & functional product and underlying technology before pursuing secondary markets. In addition to this there has been regulatory uncertainty surrounding the listing of digital assets in the United States including Kin specifically, especially since the filing of a misleading legal complaint by the US SEC. Due to this, the Kin Foundation is pressing on in other markets on behalf of the ecosystem to try and facilitate more platforms for everyone to buy & use Kin in their different ways. We do not know when Kin will be listed on exchanges, and anyone who does cannot say due to legal and security agreements.
7 - Is there any update on [Y] announcement? Can you speak on [insert rumor here]? When will we be able to do [Z]?
While we believe in maintaining the utmost transparency wherever possible, we will typically announce things as they are ready and report on progress as it becomes pertinent, as to not create unfounded hype and adhere to internal strategies. While it might be tempting to seek constant updates, please remember that answering questions takes time, and everyone is busy working hard to actually build the things we are all excited to see. We will do our best to keep everyone updated on the things they care about. We do not comment on rumors and we may be constricted in our ability to communicate at any given moment on ongoing internal affairs that may fall within certain legal or strategic confines.
8 - How can I contact the developers / support of [insert app name here]?
Please refer to the Kin Ecosystem directory below.
9 - How can I contact the Kin Foundation?
You can email us at [[email protected]](mailto:[email protected]) , or if you’d like to DM a specific representative or discuss something in an open setting you can also reach out to us and the community here.
Here are some relevant contacts that represent Kin Foundation,Kin Tel Aviv, & Kin San Francisco in the community:
Community u/benji5656
Communications u/kevin_from_kin
Developer Experience (Kin.org, Kin SDK, and Kin Developer Program) u/therealchaseeb
Blockchain (Core infrastructure of the Kin Blockchain) u/gadi_sr
Ecosystem (High touch integrations with mature developers) u/rinatbogin
KRE (The incentive protocol that drives the growth of the ecosystem) u/oradwe
UX Research u/YonatanDub
Kin San Francisco u/matty_hibs
10 - How can I track transactions on the Kin blockchain?
Here are some resources for monitoring the blockchain:
· via Kin Website https://www.kin.org/blockchainExplorer
· Kin Explorer (by u/Chancity) https://v2.kinexplorer.com/explorer
· Kin Bubbles (by u/kidwonder) https://kin-bubbles.herokuapp.com/
· Kin Transaction Visualizer (by u/sednax) http://bitcoin.interaqt.nl/kin.html
11 - I still have ERC-20 based Kin (on the Ethereum blockchain), how can I migrate?
Follow the directions laid out here: https://www.kin.org/migration/
12 - I heard the SEC is suing Kik, is that true? What does it mean for the Kin Foundation?
It’s true. After cooperating with an investigation and multiple attempts to reach an amicable settlement, the SEC filed a disparaging and mischaracterized complaint against Kik for not registering the initial sale of Kin as a security offering. Kik is fighting back. They are in a unique position to take on this case, however, unlike the initial Wells Notice, the Kin Ecosystem Foundation is not named in the complaint.
As noted by the Blockchain Association:
When we look at the Kik investigation, we can tell from the Wells Notice that the SEC originally looked at both Kik Interactive and the Kin Foundation. However, when the complaint was issued, it only focused on the offering of Kin in the September 2017 token sale, not Kin in the ecosystem today. The fact that the SEC investigated the Kin Foundation, but decided not to pursue a complaint is good news for developers, platforms, and others in the ecosystem who use these tokens because it separates the question of the token sale from the activities in the ecosystem since then. ("What the SEC-Kik complaint didn’t cover — and why this is good news for the crypto community")
As the legal battle rages on, the foundation will help Kik to amplify their defense as they correct the record publicly; but also focus on the development of the ecosystem which will continue beyond the SEC battle regardless. Expect ongoing updates as the fight continues to unfold publicly.
**Update**: - Kik has put together DefendCrypto, a fund dedicated to legal initiatives that benefit the cryptocurrency industry, so that companies that don't have the same resources can stand up against unfair regulation in fights of their own. Visit DefendCrypto.org to learn more and join the fight to defend innovation and participation in the cryptocurrency industry in the United States.
- Kik Answers SEC Complaint: https://www.prnewswire.com/news-releases/kik-answers-sec-complaint-300897681.html?tc=portal_CAP Kik has filed and published a 130 page, paragraph-by-paragraph refutation of the SEC's allegations.
- Additional Resources: Interview w/ Eileen Lyon, General Counsel and Chief Compliance Officer at Kik https://medium.com/kinblog/kin-foundation-asks-interview-w-eileen-lyon-general-counsel-and-chief-compliance-officer-at-kik-bbcf3b7a6961
13 - How was Kin distributed at launch and how does it enter circulation?
The Kin Foundation sold 1 trillion (10% of total supply) in a token distribution event in September 2017 that was split between a pre-sale (487.80 billion sold) and a public sale (512.20 billion sold). Half of the tokens sold during the pre-sale (244 billion) are subject to a one-year lock-up period. Kik received 3 trillion tokens (30% of total supply), which vested at a rate of 300 billion tokens quarterly for 10 quarters, and the Kin Foundation received 6 trillion (60% of total supply). The Kin Foundation tokens will be distributed through the Kin Rewards Engine, which divides the allocation between network participants and marketing and operational costs for the Kin Foundation (6 trillion Kin has been split into 4.5 trillion for network participants, and 1.5 trillion for marketing and other operational costs of the Kin foundation). Kin Foundation tokens for network participants are schedule to be distributed to the network at a rate of 20% of the remaining balance per year.
To learn more about and follow along with Kin allocation, check out Kin's page below, which was published in the spirit of transparency and disclosure in collaboration with Messari:
https://messari.io/asset/kin
14 - I want to integrate Kin into my software project. How do I get started? Where is the developer community?
Check out these developer resources!
Website: https://www.kin.org/developers
Documentation: https://docs.kin.org/intro
Android Tutorial Series: https://medium.com/kinblog/kin-android-development-tutorial-part-i-introduction-to-kin-83b21834a27e
Unity Tutorial Series: https://medium.com/kinblog/building-a-kin-powered-app-with-unity-cf8deef56bdb
Developer Communities: Kin Foundation Developer Forums: https://kindevforum.kin.org/ Kin Foundation Developer Discord: https://discordapp.com/invite/JavjKSx
Implementing Kin in PHP, Ruby, Javascript, Go, and 51+ Other Languages (by u/sednax): https://medium.com/@luc.hendriks/implement-kin-in-php-javascript-ruby-go-and-51-other-programming-languages-c7ae616de700
15 - How can I keep up with the latest developments in Kin?
Sign up for the Kin Newsletter here: https://ecopartners.kin.org/newsletter_signup
This subreddit also serves as a civil space for community to share and discuss developments.
Forum Rules & Guidelines
Purpose of the Forum
The KinFoundation subreddit is the public square for discussion and collaboration across the Kin ecosystem. It is important that we embrace the potential of the forum and foster a space where developers do not censor themselves, the curious are free to ask questions without shame, and holders are willing to collaborate on initiatives and discuss ongoing developments. For that reason, we have decided to broaden the discussion while also pinpointing fair and transparent moderation guidelines that will allow for a productive and healthy environment. This subreddit exists for the purpose of maintaining insight on what’s happening with the Kin Ecosystem, acting as a social gathering for its many participants, and mobilizing the community for things like collaborative initiatives, product feedback for developers, idea-sharing, and more.
Moderation Principles
· Transparency
All moderation actions should be guided by the principles laid out in this document and in the spirit of creating a productive and healthy environment for discussion & collaboration, although it is also understood to be iterative and subject to change.
· Objectivity
All moderation actions should be guided by a rules & practices-based approach, not one of personal judgment.
· Fairness
All moderation actions should be even-handed and based on agreeable principles that enable free but also fruitful discussion.
Code of Conduct
To participate in the public square, you must adhere to certain rules of conduct, which were created with the maintenance of productivity & civility in mind. Please review & refer to the rules here before and when posting:https://www.reddit.com/KinFoundation/about/rules/
Kin Ecosystem Directory
The Kin Ecosystem is a growing collective of independent teams, all aligned through a common incentive to build a more fair digital world. These teams build the tools, the infrastructure, and the apps that drive the reach and impact of Kin. As we continue to grow as an ecosystem, we want to make sure that the directory is maintained so that it can be a tool for everyone to use and contribute to. If you don’t see your app listed or want something changed, feel free to DM me or post here and tag me so that it can be updated. Some apps may be missing due to incomplete or inaccurate available details.
Organization -- Website -- Support / Contact--
· Bettapoint Website: https://bettapoint.com/ Contact: https://bettapoint.com/contact
· Castle Rush AR Website: https://www.darkvoodoostudios.com/castlerushar.html Contact: [[email protected]](mailto:[email protected]) (email)
· Catpurse Website: https://twitter.com/CatPurse1 Contact: [[email protected]](mailto:[email protected]) (email)
· Find (Find Travelers) Website: https://www.findtravelers.com/ Contact: [[email protected]](mailto:[email protected]) (email)
· FistBump.io Website: https://virtualbotgames.wixsite.com/fistbump Contact: [[email protected]](mailto:[email protected]) (email)
· imgvue Website: https://imgvue.com/ Contact: Contact Form
· Just Joking Website: https://kinloops.com/ Contact: See Website
· Kard Website: https://kinkard.org/ Contact: [[email protected]](mailto:[email protected]) (email)
· Kik Website: https://www.kik.com Contact: https://help.kik.com/hc/en-us
· Kimeo Website:https://kimeoapp.com/ Contact:[[email protected]](mailto:[email protected]) (email)
· Kinetik Website:https://www.kinetik.app/ Contact:[[email protected]](mailto:[email protected])
· KinFit Website:https://www.mykinfit.com/ Contact:[[email protected]](mailto:[email protected]) (email)
· Kin Foundation Website: https://www.Kin.org Contact: https://www.reddit.com/Kinfoundation
· Kinguist Website: Contact: [[email protected]](mailto:[email protected]) (email)
· Kinit Website:https://www.kinitapp.com/ Contact: [[email protected]](mailto:[email protected]) (email)
· Kinny Website: https://kinny.io/ Contact: [[email protected]](mailto:[email protected]) (email)
· Love & Loud Radio Website: https://www.loveandloudmusic.com/loveandloudradio Contact: [[email protected]](mailto:[email protected])
· Madlipz Website:https://www.madlipz.com/ Contact:https://www.madlipz.com/contact
· Matchmaker Website: Contact: [[email protected]](mailto:[email protected]) (email)
· MonkingMe Website: https://www.monkingme.com/ Contact: [[email protected]](mailto:[email protected]) (email)
· Nearby Website: https://www.wnmlive.com/ Contact: https://help.wnmlive.com/hc/en-us
· Pause For Website:https://pausefor.us/ Contact: [[email protected]](mailto:[email protected]) (email)
· PeerBet Website:https://peerbet.io/ Contact: [[email protected]](mailto:[email protected]) (email)
· Perfect365 Website: https://perfect365.com/ Contact: [[email protected]](mailto:[email protected]) (email)
· Photo Mail Joy Website: Contact:[[email protected]](mailto:[email protected]) (email)
· Planets Nu Website: https://planets.nu/#/home Contact:[[email protected]](mailto:[email protected]) (email)
· pop.in Website: https://pop.in/getapp Contact: [[email protected]](mailto:[email protected]) (email)
· Rave Website: https://rave.io/ Contact: https://rave.io/contact.html
· rentmole Website: https://rentmole.com/ Contact: [[email protected]](mailto:[email protected]) (email)
· Rentomania Website: http://rentomania.online/ Contact: [[email protected]](mailto:[email protected]) (email)
· RPS (Rock Paper Scissors) Website: http://www.rps.ack.ee/ Contact: [[email protected]](mailto:[email protected]) (email)
· Simple Transfer Website: https://www.kinlabs.ca/ Contact: [[email protected]](mailto:[email protected]) (email)
· Speed Genius Website: https://kinloops.com/ Contact: See website
· Step & Spend Website: Contact: [[email protected]](mailto:[email protected]) (email)
· Subti Website: https://vblago.github.io/ Contact: [[email protected]](mailto:[email protected]) (email)
· Subway Scooter Website: https://virtualbotgames.wixsite.com/fistbump Contact: [[email protected]](mailto:[email protected]) (email)
· Swelly Website: https://www.swelly.ai/ Contact: https://www.swelly.ai/#contact
· Sxlve Website: Contact:[[email protected]](mailto:[email protected]) (email)
· Syngli Website: https://www.syngli.com/ Contact: [[email protected]](mailto:[email protected]) (email)
· Tapatalk Website: https://www.tapatalk.com/ Contact: https://www.tapatalk.com/support
· ThisThat Website: https://www.thisthatapp.com/ Contact:
· Tiny Ted Website: https://www.kinlabs.ca/ Contact: [[email protected]](mailto:[email protected]) (email)
· Tippic Website: Contact: [[email protected]](mailto:[email protected]) (email)
· Trivia Clan Website: Contact: [[email protected]](mailto:[email protected]) (email)
· Trymoi Website: Contact: [[email protected]](mailto:[email protected]) (email)
· Uwe Website: https://www.uwe.ng/ Contact: [[email protected]](mailto:[email protected]) (email)
· Vent Website: https://www.vent.co/ Contact: [[email protected]](mailto:[email protected]) (email)
· Wicrypt Website: https://wicrypt.com/ Contact: [[email protected]](mailto:[email protected]) (email)
submitted by Kevin_from_Kin to KinFoundation [link] [comments]

So you want in on bitcoin?

Guide for Noobs

Simple and Not A Lot of Money

Guide for Not Noobs

Less Simple

-setup an account on coinbase.com, move dollars into your account, setup an account on gdax.com (same company, same login), move your cash from coinbase to gdax, buy your coins on GDAX at Market, fees are cheaper 0.25% versus 1.5%
-consider buying alternative coins supported by coinbase

No Fees

-all of the above but use GDAX's Limit/Buy, zero fees, but you have to wait for the market to dip below your buy price

More Money Available

-setup several Limit/Buy orders at different price points to capture dips when you are away

More Control but More Complex

-it's possible coinbase could go out of business, move some or most of your coins to a personal hardware wallet like a Trezor or Ledger Nano S, made in Czech Republic and France respectively
-consider using other exchanges with different fees and coin support
-consider buying other alternative coins supported by other exchanges

You Are Very Responsible

-create a paper wallet, put it in a safe, be warned it's like a visual bearer instrument, if you lose it or someone takes a picture of it...it's gone, but you have complete control over your money/asset

DO NOT EVER

-buy more than you can lose, it's early wild west days, the market could easily come crashing down
-panic sell, the market fluctuates regularly by 20%, thus far it has ALWAYS recovered, people that try to sell during a fall/dip and buy at the bottom usually miss time it and lose
-store your keys on your computer or phone unless its small amount, these are the two most vulnerable routes to hacking and simple hardware failure resulting in loss
-attempt to daytrade and time the best prices unless your real life job is day trading
-get addicted to watching the market, pay attention watch for dips, but don't let it crowd out your work or free time
-keep a LOT of cash or coin in an exchange, it is very easy to mistype and buy or sell far more than you meant to, exchanges can disappear with your coins
-buy a hardware wallet from anyone other than the company who makes it, i.e. do not buy one on Amazon, it is possible some third person hacked it and could steal your coin

PROBABLY DON'T

-limit sells until the far future when market volatility is down, flash crashes have happened and recovered, if you had all your coin in limit sells it would be gone
-margin trade unless your real life job is day trading
-stop buys or stop sells unless your real life job is day trading

DO

-hold your coins, your coin may be worth x10 or more in value in the future, e.g. if bitcoin replaced gold, bitcoin would be worth ~x70 the current value
-buy small amounts over time DCA, this might not seem intuitive but it spreads your risk out, reduces risk of buying at all time highs (ATH) and more likely to catch lows (dips), a fluctuation of $100 in price is small if the eventual value is worth x10 or more in the future
-keep a small amount of cash on an exchange always, when there is a lot of traffic/trading which happens during dips, you are much more likely to be able to make trades on an exchange rather than with your own wallet

REMEMBER

-if you don't have your coin in your own wallet, it's not your coin. this is not a problem until you have a lot of value and you want to keep it safe from a bankruptcy, unscrupulous people/exchanges, or unforeseen acts. if it's a small amount compared to your income it's an acceptable risk, if not then move it to a wallet
-in the days of fake news not everything you read is true, in fact there are armies of people shilling for 'pick a random coin'; some are malicious, some uninformed, and some willfully uninformed
-if your value starts to become large, dig deep into how your asset/currencies work just like you would for any other purchase, understanding how it works helps you understand if it will be a success, e.g. understand the difference between PoW vs PoS or what a hard fork is
-some coins especially newer ones are scams, a good indication of if it is not a scam is how long the coin has been around
-most bitcoin hard forks so far have not been successful with some exceptions
-btc is the accepted short-name for bitcoin on most (but not all) exchanges, xbt is also common in EUR-land

Other Risks

-holding your own coin requires personal responsibility, it is easy to lose and not be able to recover it if you are not careful
-again, do not buy more coin than you can lose
-transaction speeds which are slow are a serious problem in bitcoin scaling
-there is less innovation and more argument going on in bitcoin than some other coins, bitcoin is large enough that consensus is difficult, future change is less likely than with some other coins, there are other side solutions to bitcoins problems that may not require bitcoin to change much
-bitcoin.org IS the generally accepted bitcoin website, NOT bitcoin.com
-important other risks compiled by themetalfriend
-coinbase has insurance up to $250k USD for you USD Wallet which DOES NOT cover your bitcoins or other crypto currencies, they claim to have separate insurance for your crypto currency but it is unclear how much

Community

there are a lot of memes
-hodl, GameKyuubi mistyped hold and it spread
-to the moon, where everyone hopes the price will go
-coin on a rollercoaster, it is highly volitile market you will see this during fluctuations
-this is gentlemen, via Liquid_child , here
-lambo/roadster, a car people want to buy when they get rich
-the cost of pizza, early days someone bought a pizza for 10,000btc which is worth over ~80million USD today
-tesla/vehicle with a bitcoin chart, cytranic posted a picture that spread
-intersting guide by stos313 , here. I do not agree with everything but it has a lot of useful information.

CORRECTIONS

Edit: Adding in user comments.
Edit: Crosslinking to a more Beginner Version.
Edit: Note in an earlier edit of this guide I said.
note that most of the development on bitcoin is by employees of one company, it is open source but their priorities may not align with the community
This is not true. Blockstream appears to have a high representation but not an overwhelming amount. You can compare blockstream's employee page and bitcoin's commits in the last year. Thank you to lclc_ , trilli0nn , and Holographiks for pointing this out. See this for a detailed break down.
Edit: Clarification that FDIC insurance does NOT cover crypto currency/assets.
Edit: Clarity on who owns bitcoin.org

Good Luck and Hodl.

Please comment if your experience is different. Or call out things I missed.
submitted by cryptocurrencypeople to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

How a Web Company developed the Game about Web Companies using Vue.js instead of Redux and MobX

How a Web Company developed the Game about Web Companies using Vue.js instead of Redux and MobX
Hey! It’s been almost 15 years since we started to create and develop web services. You might have heard about them, given them a try, or even be an avid fan, but that's not the point.
We had two well known products on the website building market — uCoz and uKit site builders. Over 90% of registered website creators never got down to creating a website, and this gave us the ambition to create Web Tycoon with the two and a half people on the team that had some game development experience. Not that this was a perfect launchpad for releasing a game about web industry… But you get the idea.

Start of the Winding Path

59,845 backend strings and 65,675 frontend strings coded. More than two years of development, failures, dead ends and seven interface options.These are the trials that we have experienced, though it may haunt the dreams of some team members for a long time.
Why did the people behind a company that focuses mainly on site builders all of a sudden take on a task to create (successfully!) a multiplayer online strategy, even though it’s industry-related, about sites and webmasters?
At some point we realized that uCoz, as a product, started to get out of date. This served as one of the reasons to create a fresh solution, uKit. Which would be okay if the underlying problem hadn't been more serious and hadn't rooted in nothing other than patterns of human behavior. It doesn't matter what website builder we are talking about, be it uKit, uCoz, Wix, Tilda, Jimdo, LPmotor or any other. The majority of registered users will never create a site. This fact is very easy to check, just compare the number of registrations (without bots) against the number of working domain names/active clients.
Why is this so? It’s a good question that we tried to tackle by doing feedback surveys with our and competitors' customers on the phone. “I’ll do it tomorrow.” “Next week.” “Everything is great and user-friendly, but there’s no time for it right now.” The same stuff people say when they buy a gym membership and never show up to work out.
That’s when a simple idea emerged. What if we try to retain at least a part of this audience by inviting them to play a site building game? After all, we have already paid to attract their attention.

Everyone Dreams of Making Their Thing into a Game

No one is going to believe me entirely, but making a personally relatable game wasn’t the key motive. Although the tale is as old as time, “I’m a musician, let’s make a game about musicians!”, “I’m a game developer, let’s make Game Dev Tycoon!” (there is a ton of such examples, especially in the indie genre), this was not the case.
Game Dev Tycoon is a clear success story. It can be seen from loads of copycats and extension to mobile platforms. There’s a big difference between us (different mechanics, different setting), yet it's what Web Tycoon is most often compared with.
Game about Web Companies

Hitting the First Stumbling Block

It was all settled, we were positioned to create a game. I’ve already mentioned our staff in the intro paragraph and how our teams were busy with existing projects, so it can be understood how it didn’t make sense to distract them. What did that mean for us? It meant we had to outsource the work to professionals. This was our first real stumbling block.
First of all, we made an honest effort to hire a capable game development studio. Luckily, industry friends and fellows gave us a few pointers on where it was worth going to. Everyone we talked to liked the project concept, and game studios were happy to take the job.
Here are a few obstacles we stumbled upon next:
  • Yeah, we admit it, our game designer blew it off. “Good luck with your project!”
  • Want a browser game? No problem, we’ll build it with Unity. It’s not an issue that each user will need to install a browser plugin (back then it was the only available option), everyone has it!
A chunk of our budget was shelled out to buy game design documents prepared for us by two studios. The output was quite hefty. A great deal of work was done, no one's arguing this. But what was delivered to us was a very different idea. This proverb describes the situation at its best, “If you’re a hammer, everything looks like a nail.” It was evident that people are used to doing things in a familiar way based on their established practices for GDDs, and generally dislike getting off the beaten track.
But now that I think about it, something good did come out of this. This period of wandering from studio to studio helped us decide on one incredibly valuable thing, the project name. The original code name was uWebmaster (after all, the game is about a webmaster, plus our company has a custom of naming products using the “u” prefix). Next, a more relevant idea — Internet Tycoon — came up. This later on transformed into Web Tycoon.

Second Stumbling Block, Switching to In-House

When we realized that the design studio thing was not working, we took the decision to handle it in-house. Then the lengthy hiring stage started. We were searching for a key figure for the project, a game designer. Someone who could grasp the concept, was passionate about this genre, qualified for this kind of work, and all of those sorts of things.
I don’t want to go into much detail here, the topic of who the game designers are is far from being simple. It’s controversial how to, if at all, write GDDs. There is even controversy around if a game designer should play the game they create while still being a manager. That's a matter for a separate and flame-war discussion. Let's just say that to date the project and the team has survived four game designers (including a junior designer) due to varying reasons.
The team recruitment was anything but easy. For a long time, the game’s only representative was a game designer (one of the four mentioned above). The main reason for this was the “leftover principle” and necessary high requirements. Well, first of all, the developers were needed for the main project, and they were recruited quite successfully for it. However, we couldn’t seem to hunt down a technical director. Of course, that was not good. If you take a decision to build a full-fledged game team, be sure to go the whole way. Understandably, we kept stumbling upon various staff issues for a long time.
When the technical director was finally found, he was a Jack of all trades. For a long time he was a team leader, an architect, and a regular worker. It was quite a challenge for us to fix the employee situation. It took us about six months to finally form a full-staffed team. The trickiest part, oddly enough, was to find an illustrator. Surprisingly, our office manager filled that position.
Summing up this part of the story, we can say that our game team fully established two years ago. There was someone for any task, be it designing interfaces or writing code. They even introduced scrum a bit later, which had been a regular practice for the rest of the company by that time.

Design and Interface

The game now looks like this:
https://preview.redd.it/z9w1n8xz2nu21.png?width=1440&format=png&auto=webp&s=0e709e487bbed319909620f5985418d9b48541ab
The interface is quite unusual for a game, and some people might find its look not really exciting. But that’s a deliberate choice. At first glance, it appears more like a web portal rather than a game.
When I asked friends to take a look at the screenshots, I often heard something like “Isn’t it an admin page?”, “I thought it was someone’s stats, not a game.” Those who belonged to our target audience loved the interface right away. They wanted a truly authentic thing rather than something cartoonish. Though we may lose some casual gamers because of the chosen visual style, we believe in its “clean and straight-to-the-point” design.
What finally made us believe that a game doesn’t have to look typical was Football Manager. A simulator may not look gamesome but can still be a success. The genre makes it possible.
After the style was selected, we worked out a few variants of UI design. Below are some alternative solutions offered by different designers.

AI Is Always Better

Gamers love skins and cosmetics. We haven’t integrated them to the game, but have already learned how to turn players' photos into avatars. The most interesting part is that it happens thanks to an innovative approach to machine learning and involves training models without using datasets.
An avatar is not transformed by means of picture stylization like it’s done in Prisma and other similar services. Instead, it’s generated from the elements of our avatar builder. Even though a machine cannot outdo humans when it comes to photo vs avatar similarity, our AI has reached the results as good as people can produce, which we believe is a success considering its initial task.
We plan to continue developing this technology and will keep you posted about the results. If you can’t wait to play around with the avatar builder, DM us and we will give you this opportunity :-)

Going Mobile

The closer we were to the release, the clearer it was that the game would look great on mobile devices. Sometimes even better than on desktop. At the same time, our desktop players seemed to make a perfect audience so far. They were actively discussing IT stuff in the game chat, making bots for game automation and exploring our undocumented API.
The game was initially developed with the intention to create a browser game first, test its mechanics and balance, and then build native apps. This wasn’t supposed to take a while thanks to the embedded API, but that’s not how it turned out.
In the end, there was no time and budget left to implement this beautiful plan. Moreover, almost all of the publishers we reached out to were mostly interested in a mobile game and asked to came back once it was ready.
We needed some kind of compromise, so the team built iOS and Android apps with Cordova in a matter of two months. It’s obvious that the result wasn’t flawless (decent though) but it allowed the game to be played quite smoothly. Overall, it was a good chance for us to check if the mobile users were going to like our product.

Issues with App Store

It was a bit of a struggle to get our mobile app show up in the App Store. First it was rejected with a comment like this, “You are a web application, so your users can open it in Safari.” But we fixed this eventually.
Then, we had to rename our our eye-pleasing game currency from Bitcoin to Webcoin to comply with Apple’s requirements. To be fair, guys from Apple are right and this name might actually be misleading for our users. But the new one seems to be giving a different vibe to the game.

Technical Stuff

Migration from React and Redux to Vue and Vuex

We are obviously treading on thin ice by bringing up this topic, so here’s a disclaimer first: we don’t try to impose our views on our readers and will agree if you say we could have made it work without any migrations. We just want to tell the story of how it was and describe the reasons for our choice of technologies.
The first revolution in the game creation process, even though a peaceful one, was our switch from React and Redux to Vue and Vuex.
Inside the company, we try to develop our products using the same stack of technologies. First of all, it’s a matter of gaining expertise and it gives us an opportunity to quickly transfer employees from one team to another. At this moment, we mostly use NodeJS, React, and MongoDB.
It was quite daunting to develop a game that has lots of data and relations with NoSQL. In the end it took us a week to migrate there through blood, sweat, and tears, but we’ll get to that.

Why We Moved from React to Vue Halfway Through

A new game designer changed the game’s core mechanics, which resulted in a major makeover of most of the interfaces. We created a prototype of the new mechanics using Vue, the reason for this choice being the low threshold of entry. At this point we had already worked out, and started, introducing a vector system of traffic, income and energy calculation. Before, the data had been stored in the database and we hadn’t taken the speed of data change into account.
At first, we used Redux together with React. The store was growing in size very fast — each time a player did something to a game’s site, it created a new record. This led to the mutation of the store and recalculation of getters, which contained complicated formulas of traffic and income, so the whole thing got laggy as hell.
Yeah, we could have gone with MobX, could have updated our calculation formulas, but the team was too focused on making major changes to the core mechanics at the time. It just didn’t happen. In Redux, we tried to fix this by connecting more than one store, while out-of-the-box features in Vuex allowed us to create any number of submodules without any hustle.
We also loved Vue’s syntactic sugar and flexibility. For example, in order to set up regular updates for any component value, instead of the computed property
foo() { return bar + baz; } 
we write
foo() { return (this.oneTick, bar + baz); } 
A little bit of magic is hidden in the this.oneTick property, which is reactive and updates once per second bringing up a component rerender in case the result of bar + baz is changed.

Database Migration

Speaking of the backend, we made a small migration and a pretty big one.
The project was first made with MySQL because we thought that it was simple and quick, and that relations and other perks were not necessary. Then we grew up and easily switched to PostgreSQL.
The more significant, and difficult, objective was our move to MongoDB. MongoDB was chosen due to its better scalability and performance. There were many more problems during the second migration even though we used an ORM. However, it took us only an hour to enable replica sets and automatic failover.

A Few Words About Publishers

Let’s start by saying that we are waiting for them. At this time the only one that has believed in us is Mail.Ru, a major Russian internet company, and we are grateful for this opportunity. Very soon we will learn how popular our browser game is with their audience.
Clever books and podcasts say that you should go to publishers somewhere at the halfway point rather than when a game is ready to be rolled out. That’s exactly what we did — our team started building bridges long before the release, which also included our trip to the DevGamm conference last November.
What we expected:
“Yeah okay, just change this and that, and we will be happy to try your game.”
What feedback we got instead:
“That’s great — fresh and non-standard, with the interesting setting, just come back as soon as the game is released and has some has monetization functions in it.”
All in all, the theory let us down. When we tried to find out why, the answer was: “Your game is different, so…”
Frankly speaking, we don’t see so much non-standard in the game, but they know better.
In general, we received positive feedback from the game industry reps. The market appears to be oversaturated with those kill-a-dragon and conquer-a-castle kind of games. Though, it might be just our personal impression.

In conclusion

So, that concludes the story of our journey to the soft launch. This is not a case of “we know for sure it’s going to be successful,” and it’s still a little too soon to call it a success at this point. Your opinion is important and we will be glad to get feedback and questions in the comments.
And welcome to the Web Tycoon:
web-tycoon.com/en
AppStore
Google Play
submitted by Zoranth to vuejs [link] [comments]

Patch 0.8.0.1208

Patch has been Released!

The 0.8.0.1208 update has added the new Interchange map and new game mechanics to Escape from Tarkov
We are happy to announce the release of a major update, 0.8.0.1208, for the closed beta version of multiplayer online FPS Escape from Tarkov. This game update introduces the new Interchange map, modern and somewhat atypical compared to the rest of Tarkov locations so far. The Interchange, besides obvious highways, features a huge shopping mall with shops and restaurants. The new location provides conditions for honing new confined space combat tactics. It should be noted that for some time after the update there will not be any AI adversaries on the location, they will be added in the following patches. Also, traditionally, along with a new location, we have introduced a new trader - Ragman, who sells everything related to garments and equipment.
We also would like to announce that the current update applied new, experimental methods for optimizing the handling of game physics on client and server, as well as new means to reduce network latency. In addition, specifically for the new Interchange map, new object rendering optimization technology was applied. Over the course of the upcoming testing, these methods will be applied to other locations as well, resulting in an additional performance gain. We admit that in the process of testing the new game update, you may experience various problems associated with new methods of optimization and new game features. All the emerging problems will be processed through the system of bug reports and promptly fixed. Moreover, the launcher was updated as well, along with numerous other fixes and changes. The new EFT update has also introduced a basic training that is going to help new players to understand and master the basic mechanics of the game faster and better.
"As promised, we are gradually and continuously introducing new features and realistic mechanics," said Nikita Buyanov, the head of Battlestate Games. "So, after this update, players will have to spend more time on loading and unloading of the magazines, check the number of cartridges in the magazine and chamber. Note that different magazines affect the loading/unloading rate differently, and there is now a new specialized character skill - Mag Drills."
Other additions to the game content include new weapons, among them, the Springfield Armory M1A, Remington 870, AAR, APB and new models of AK including 100-series as well as numerous items for weapon modification. Overall, more than 60 new gear and equipment items were added to the game, including bags and vests, body armors and helmets, weapon modifications, ammunition and medicine cases, hats, glasses, and balaclavas. A detailed list of the new equipment was previously posted on our official website of the game and in the social network communities. You can find the patch notes below!
Finally, the update has been combined with the long-anticipated profile reset (wipe).
The following updates, among other improvements and changes, are going to further improve the project performance, network quality, bug fixes, and add new game combat mechanics. Soon, Escape from Tarkov is scheduled to feature the advanced armor system, flea market, Hideout and other features that were mentioned in the plans for 2018. Development and testing of the future innovations are already underway. Also, the test results of this update will have a crucial influence on deciding the Open Beta launch date. We are sure you are excited for all this as much as we are.

Patch Notes

Please take note that first hours after the update servers may experience heavy load leading to increased matching time possible network delays.
Please, take into consideration that this update is a part of the Closed Beta testing. Some of the introduced innovations can potentially lead to previously unknown issues or bugs. Please be sure to report all discovered issues through the launcher built-in bug report system. This will help fix them promptly.
This update comes with a profile reset/wipe. All bonus gears can be obtained again from your profile.
Added:
Time-consuming loading/unloading of ammo
  • Loading/unloading of ammo into the magazine does not happen instantly. The time required to load/unload one cartridge may vary depending on the magazine and the level of the new skill, Mag drills.
  • Time is spent on loading and unloading ammo in the raid only, in the menu the procedures stay the same as before.
  • Loading and unloading can only be done with inventory open. If you close it or switch tabs, loading or unloading is interrupted. The cartridges that were already loaded into the mag, stay in it (and vice versa in case of unloading).
  • Only one magazine can be loaded or unloaded simultaneously.
  • The Info window displays the loading/unloading and mag check speed bonus if it is not 0.
  • If you’ve started loading an empty mag, or unloading a full one, the precise number of rounds is displayed.
Checking mags, hidden precise number of cartridges in the magazine
  • By default, it is unknown how many cartridges are in the mag, if it is not examined (hereinafter referred to as "Unknown/Checked"). Mag counter displays an unknown number of cartridges. For example: (?/30)
  • Check accuracy is determined by new "Mag Drills" skill.
  • The magazine can be checked either by animation - Alt+T or through the interface by Right-clicking and selecting Check magazine.
  • If you checked the number on the 0 skill level, then it returns "~empty" - "<1/2" - "~1/2" - ">1/2" - "~full". As skill level 1 an approximate number will be shown. On level 2 - the precise amount of ammo will be provided.
  • Full and empty mags are considered to be checked.
  • All the magazines you take into the raid are checked automatically.
  • Loading/unloading a checked mag doesn’t change the state, it remains checked.
  • After firing, the number of cartridges in the magazine become unknown.
  • Ammo check precision now depends on the Mag Drills skill, not on Weapon Mastering.
  • Outside of the raid, the number of cartridges is always displayed precisely.
  • If you have dropped a checked mag and picked it back up, it remains checked. If someone picked it up and dropped it again, it becomes unknown to you.
Checking the chamber
  • The chamber also requires checking. Bnly by animation using the key binding Shift + T.
  • If you load the cartridge into an unknown chamber, it automatically becomes checked.
  • If the shot was fired from a checked mag (first shot), the chamber remains checked. Otherwise, it becomes unknown as well.
New location:
Equipment:
Bags:
Tactical Vests:
Body armor:
Helmets:
Weapon modifications:
Cases:
Weapons:
AI Improvements:
Optimizations:
Fixed:
Changes:
Known issues:
submitted by LewisUK_ to EscapefromTarkov [link] [comments]

High frequency trading software - YouTube Visualization of Bitcoin Development so far Apr 13 2017 Live Bitcoin Trading With DeriBot on Deribit Live Bitcoin Trading With DeriBot on Deribit Live Bitcoin Trading With DeriBot on Deribit

Learn more about the joint venture between Whinstone (a US-based developer of high-speed data centers) and Northern Bitcoin (a Norwegian mining operation that claims to run on 100% renewable energy), and their 2020 roadmap. ️ Timeline visualization of Bitcoin’s mining distribution. A visualization of popular keywords from Bitcoin and blockchain-related events on the site Meetup.com, shown above, gives you a sense of how crypto communities have evolved over the past 8 years. The chart also highlights how crypto investing first gained popularity as a direct consequence of the 2008 financial crisis. In the years that followed, early Bitcoiners, many of them burned by the ... Since each block has a limited size, an unusually high amount of transactions will cause the list to get larger, and will likely make confirmations longer. A nifty feature about Bitcoin is that a user can choose their transaction fee, and the higher it is, the more likely miners will prioritize their transaction. Tacking a high transaction fee compared to others within the Mempool will likely ... Bitcoin mining still remains one of the ... mining hardware does, and it provides you with useful statistics, which include the temperature of the hardware, fan speed, as well as the mining speed and hashrate information. The software will also require you to set up your own Bitcoin wallet, where it will send all the BTC that you manage to mine as part of your efforts. You can use any wallet ... 1. Introduction. Given its innovative features, such as its decentralization and traceability, Bitcoin has attracted much attention from the media and investors (Fry and Cheah, 2016; Urquhart, 2016).Unlike sovereign currency, Bitcoin is a kind of decentralized digital currency that is not backed by any government's credit, and so the volatility of the price of Bitcoin is extremely high (Sun et ...

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High frequency trading software - YouTube

High frequency trading software from http://westernpips.com skype:westernpips mail:[email protected] High frequency trading software a trading system bas... Nanex released a video showing the results of half a second of worldwide high frequency trading with Johnson and Johnson stock. I simply sped up the footage ... HIGH-RISK! For demonstration purpose only! Please note that the bot in the Livestream is set to demonstrate insane trading speed. It was NOT tested in long run, and most likely will result in ... For more information: https://www.bitcoinmining.com and https://www.weusecoins.com What is Bitcoin Mining? Have you ever wondered how Bitcoin is generated? T... Good Morning Music VR 360° Positive Vibrations - 528Hz The Deepest Healing - Boost Your Vibration - Duration: 2:00:01. Nature Healing Society Recommended for you. 360°

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